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Ultimate Street suspension guide

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    mikemounlio
    Senior Member

  • mikemounlio
    replied
    I went 120 in the rear because i plan to tow around a bike from time to time. I have a single 10 in lucifer and its more then enough. I have had big giant systems in the past. A couple minutes and they just hurt your head. In the festiva you are so close to the sub you dont need a bunch.

    When lucifer is back on the road i might even take the sub out. I want to room and the light weight in the rear. Sub is nice but normal radio is just fine as well.

    Back to your question. If you must run 2 12" subs in the rear then you want 120 for sure. If you already have the 2 12"s try to trade them off for one nice high end 10. a good 10 sounds so much better in a small space then a 12 IMHO

    Leave a comment:

  • FestYboy
    Moderator

  • FestYboy
    replied
    How substantial is the box? And what do you need 2 12s for in a car that has the same cabin space as most full sized car's trunks? 1 good 8 in the right box will drive you out of the car.

    Besides, this thread is about improving the handling and adding weight is a step in the wrong direction.

    Leave a comment:

  • Ljh8394
    Junior Member

  • Ljh8394
    replied
    Hey Mike was wondering if I were to put 2 12in subs in the back would I need the 105 or the 120 should I just go 120 to be safe?
    Ljh8394
    Junior Member
    Last edited by Ljh8394; 09-20-2016, 12:21 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • mikemounlio
    Senior Member

  • mikemounlio
    replied
    look at page 1 and its the last couple pictures. You will see excatly how i did mine. Mine have been doing great.

    Leave a comment:

  • mikemounlio
    Senior Member

  • mikemounlio
    replied
    Originally posted by Wimp View Post
    When installing the rears, do you use the top spring hats that came with the coilover sleeve kit or the ones that came with the hottuning coilovers? Or do you just buy a different set?
    Look at my pictures. I think i showed excatly how mine were done.

    Leave a comment:

  • Wimp
    Junior Member

  • Wimp
    replied
    When installing the rears, do you use the top spring hats that came with the coilover sleeve kit or the ones that came with the hottuning coilovers? Or do you just buy a different set?

    Leave a comment:

  • Advancedynamix
    Modifier

  • Advancedynamix
    replied
    Yeah, I see no problem with that.

    Leave a comment:

  • william
    I Spend Too Much Time Here

  • william
    replied
    I'm running just rears 120 springs and adjusters all the way up its still about 2 inches lower than stock. But handles good rides good I say go for it

    Leave a comment:

  • firebush357
    Ginger Pubes!

  • firebush357
    replied
    What are your thoughts on just running the Rear setup for a while? Race Car on a budget and all... My thoughts are possible runs this rear setup for better handling and to lower the rear some to level the ride hide. Good Idea? Bad Idea?

    Leave a comment:

  • Advancedynamix
    Modifier

  • Advancedynamix
    replied
    You'll want 10" Brad. You can get away with 12" (fronts, 12" rears aren't available in the 1.875" springs) if you don't want to lower the car much. 8" (front only) will work but could be bouncy with a 140lb spring (the shorter the spring the steeper the rate rises.)
    Advancedynamix
    Modifier
    Last edited by Advancedynamix; 08-02-2016, 01:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • bhazard
    This is now more then a hobby!

  • bhazard
    replied
    Okay. Currently have 200 fronts and 140 rears but when I put my mk1 rear setup together I'll prolly go for 120s and maybe put the 140s up front. This is the automatic car by the way.

    What about the spring length?

    Leave a comment:

  • Advancedynamix
    Modifier

  • Advancedynamix
    replied
    Originally posted by bhazard View Post
    Charlie do you still recommend 120/105 spring rates for full weight cars like mine? Are these all 10 inch springs too or?
    120/105 with stock engine placement. 150/105 for g series.

    150/120 for heavy loads.
    Advancedynamix
    Modifier
    Last edited by Advancedynamix; 07-11-2016, 12:13 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • Festiver
    Member

  • Festiver
    replied
    Originally posted by Advancedynamix View Post
    The 120lb/105lb rate is only slightly stiffer than stock, but the geometry of this setup and the dampening rate is such that the car will handle like a finely tuned sports car. This suspension is not your typical "tuner ride" that is harsh and bouncy. It's an improvement everywhere from stock.
    The amount your tires contact your fenders depends on what tires you want to run, the offset and width of your wheels and your camber settings. With negative camber, and the right tires, you won't rub at all with slight wheel gap. Here are some examples of cars that don't rub at all or only a little in extreme cases. These cars all have rolled fenders, but the fenders have not been cut at all.




    This is a 13x6 wheel, 12mm offset. Approximately 3.5" suspension drop. 175/50-13 tires. -3 degrees camber all the way around. No rubbing at all.




    These wheels are 14x7 with a 15mm offset. The tires are 165/55-14. The suspension is dropped about 3.75". About 3 degrees negative camber all the way around. No rubbing and a really comfortable ride. Note: this car was driven like this for a 6000 mile road trip with no abnormal tire wear issues. It was very comfortable and was stable at well over 100mph. The car was raced in time trials racing at a local track and was capable of spec miata lap times on these tires. A very versatile setup.





    The wheels are 15x7 with a 28mm offset. Tires are 165/45-15. Car is about 3.5" lower than stock. Camber is set at -2.8 degrees all the way around. Note: Car was driven on 6000 mile road trip with no abnormal tire wear issues.




    The wheels are 15x6 with 43mm offset and 10mm wheel spacers for a 33mm final offset. Tires are 165/45-15. Car has a 3" drop from stock. Rear camber is stock, front is at 2 degrees. Note: all 3 cars in this photo have this suspension setup and are all daily driven by people over 50 years old. The two cars in the background have both been from coast to coast and back with no problems.
    Wow those are sexy cars being as I'm gonna bp g series swap soon (hopefully) definitely bp swap by the end of summer I'll follow your suggestion of the 175 front and I'll do the 150 rear that way there is no worries about weight but right now I'm running a 16x8 +0 with a 205/40r16 nitto neogens with the aspire swap I'm like 2" out of the wheel wells so ill probably do the suspension swap to the mk2 front and mk1 rear coils and put higher bump stops in give myself like 1.5" of flex before the stops cut my fenders and widen them and im gonna aim for -3-4 camber at all corners my proper fitment monster truck

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:

  • bhazard
    This is now more then a hobby!

  • bhazard
    replied
    Charlie do you still recommend 120/105 spring rates for full weight cars like mine? Are these all 10 inch springs too or?

    Leave a comment:

  • Advancedynamix
    Modifier

  • Advancedynamix
    replied
    The 120lb/105lb rate is only slightly stiffer than stock, but the geometry of this setup and the dampening rate is such that the car will handle like a finely tuned sports car. This suspension is not your typical "tuner ride" that is harsh and bouncy. It's an improvement everywhere from stock.
    The amount your tires contact your fenders depends on what tires you want to run, the offset and width of your wheels and your camber settings. With negative camber, and the right tires, you won't rub at all with slight wheel gap. Here are some examples of cars that don't rub at all or only a little in extreme cases. These cars all have rolled fenders, but the fenders have not been cut at all.




    This is a 13x6 wheel, 12mm offset. Approximately 3.5" suspension drop. 175/50-13 tires. -3 degrees camber all the way around. No rubbing at all.




    These wheels are 14x7 with a 15mm offset. The tires are 165/55-14. The suspension is dropped about 3.75". About 3 degrees negative camber all the way around. No rubbing and a really comfortable ride. Note: this car was driven like this for a 6000 mile road trip with no abnormal tire wear issues. It was very comfortable and was stable at well over 100mph. The car was raced in time trials racing at a local track and was capable of spec miata lap times on these tires. A very versatile setup.





    The wheels are 15x7 with a 28mm offset. Tires are 165/45-15. Car is about 3.5" lower than stock. Camber is set at -2.8 degrees all the way around. Note: Car was driven on 6000 mile road trip with no abnormal tire wear issues.




    The wheels are 15x6 with 43mm offset and 10mm wheel spacers for a 33mm final offset. Tires are 165/45-15. Car has a 3" drop from stock. Rear camber is stock, front is at 2 degrees. Note: all 3 cars in this photo have this suspension setup and are all daily driven by people over 50 years old. The two cars in the background have both been from coast to coast and back with no problems.
    Advancedynamix
    Modifier
    Last edited by Advancedynamix; 07-10-2016, 09:34 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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